Knowledge

CBD and sport

CBD and sport

The wider mainstream interest in the cannabinoids’ impact on health has not gone unnoticed in professional sports. Although the officials and professional athletes have been looking at cannabis suspiciously so far, mainly due to its psychoactive ingredient THC, in the recent years it has begun to change. There are more and more reports of beneficial effects of cannabinoids, especially CBD, on athlete’s organisms. At the same time, the natural components of hemp seem so safe to use, that some of the largest sport organizations, urged by the public, scientists and the athletes themselves, have changed their attitude towards cannabinoids, crossing off cannabidiol from the prohibited substances lists. Better even, CBD is gaining more and more acceptance as a mild natural dietary supplement for athletes. Can CBD really be useful for those who leading an active lifestyle, improving their performance or protecting them against injuries? Everything suggests that the answer is yes – let’s look into this, then. More »

Most of the online CBD products mislabeled, recent study reveals

Most of the online CBD products mislabeled, recent study reveals

The recent study by Dr. Bonn-Miller’s from the University of Pennsylvania Medical School has shown that up to two thirds of online vendors provide incorrect data regarding cannabinoid content on their product’s labels! The market for hemp products is extremely fragmented, both in the European Union and in the United States, mainly because of inconsistencies between federal law and dozens of varying state/country regulations. While most of the CBD products are not illegal, their manufacturers are often forced to operat in the gray zone of juridical chaos. And this impacts customers – one of the practical consequences of the situation can be the unequal quality of CBD products. More »

Using CBD Hemp Oils During Pregnancy

Using CBD Hemp Oils During Pregnancy

The history of the therapeutic use of cannabis is so long and complex, that no wonder it involved use by pregnant women, or in labour. In fact – the oldes documented cases of such cannabis use in Mesopotamia date back to 2.0000 years BC! But what does modern science says about utility (and safety!) of such application of this ancient plant? And where does it put one of the safest hemp products – the CBD hemp oil? More »

Bioavailability of cannabinoids – suppositories (6/6)

Bioavailability of cannabinoids – suppositories (6/6)

Rectal administration is rare. One of the possible reasons for this is that the research concludes so far that THC administered rectally is not absorbed into the bloodstream [1,2]. Some success (absorbance levels of 10-70% depending on the formulation and animal tested) has been reached with using synthetic THC derivatives [3-6]. Such results can explain why most of the user would not experience “high” after administrating THC per rectum (at least as in comparison with other methods of administrations). More »

Bioavailability of cannabinoids – transdermal (5/6)

Bioavailability of cannabinoids – transdermal (5/6)

Transdermal delivery of cannabinoids is a little researched topic, although such intake method is a potentially interesting solution, as it would allow for the cannabinoids to slowly infiltrate directly into the bloodstream, when administred, for instance, in the form of patches [1]. Preliminary studies have shown that properly prepared patches are able to provide stable and long-lasting (at least 48h) release of < ?-8-THC> into the bloodstream [2]. On the other hand, though, it is also known, that cannabinoids are generally strongly apolar, so they would tend to accumulate in the outer layers of the skin hardly penetrating its deeper layers. More »

Bioavailability of cannibnoids – oral intake (4/6)

Bioavailability of cannibnoids – oral intake (4/6)

In case of oral intake (or – to put it simply – eating)of cannabinoids their bioavailability (efficiency of their unmodified forms’ transport into blood plasma) depends on two things: the efficiency of transporting through the stomach to the intestine and then – on their metabolism in the liver. Here we face the first obstacle – it is known that cannabinoids can degrade in an acidic environment, as is the case in the stomach [1]. However, this can be easily prevented with the use of a suitable carrier – other oily components of hemp plant or addition of some extra oil from seeds can effectively shield the precious active substances, as oils are generally not metabolized in the stomach, thus can effectively hinder the effect of on cannabinoids. This simple trick is effectively put into use by the producer of Marinol – in this case THC is dissolved in sesame oil which allows for the level of 90-95% [2] Note, that the absorbance level should not be confused with total relative bioavailability – as it was explained in a few articles published here, the latter one is measured by the active substance’s concentration in blood plasma, which might be lower than the initial level due to the fact that the large amounts of cannabinoids absorbed in the intestines are metabolized in the liver before they can occur in the blood. More »

Cannabinoids bioavailability – sublingual intake (3/6)

Cannabinoids bioavailability – sublingual intake (3/6)

Sublingual intake of cannabiboids can be compared to inhalation in terms of bioavailability because, as in the case of absorption in the lungs, absorption from the mucous membrane under the tongue allows for the cannabinoids to enter the bloodstream relatively fast and in their unaltered form [1]. Of course, the absorpton is also possible in the whole <oral – jama ustna> (eg, in between the cheeks and the gums, in the inside of the cheeks or in the throat already), but the sublingual application not only makes it possible to place a large amount of the substance at once, but also limits the intensive taste experience – a factor to be taken into consideration while intaking cannabinoids. More »

Bioavailability of cannabinoids – inhalation (2/6)

Bioavailability of cannabinoids – inhalation (2/6)

Inhalation, epecially smoking, is the most common way of cannabinoids intake. This administration method allows the cannabinoids to directly enter the bloodstream. If the inhalation is carried out in high temperature (as in the smoking of <vaporization> (vaping?)process), the user absorps practically only the <phenolic> (neutral) forms of cannabinpids – such as CBD, THC, CBG, etc., as all their acidic forms (CBDA, THCA, CBGA, etc.) are instantly <decarboxylated> due to the high temperature. More »

Natural cannabinoids bioavailability (1/6)

Natural cannabinoids bioavailability (1/6)

Each compound introduced into our bodies can be tracked and divided into four stages: absoprtion, distribution, metabolism and elimination. As an introduction to this big issue, we take on the first bit – absorption of cannabinoids. More »